Buff Ermine Spilosoma lutea

Erebidae » Arctiinae

Buff Ermine Spilosoma luteum

72.019 (BF2061) Buff Ermine Spilosoma luteum (Hufnagel, 1766)

Wingspan 28-40mm. Forewing length 17-22mm.

A rather attractive pale buff coloured species with a variable number and size of dark blotches on the forewings.

Buff Ermine Spilosoma luteum

The adult flies May to July, and is attracted to light sources. Found in most habitats, including woodland, hedgerows, parks and gardens. A resident species, common and widespread throughout. The larva feeds on a wide range of herbaceous and woody plants.

© Pete Hillman July 2013.

 

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Scarce Footman Eilema complana

Erebidae » Arctiinae

Scarce Footman Eilema complana

Scarce Footman Eilema complana (Linnaeus, 1758) 72.046 BF2047

Wingspan 28-35 mm. Forewing length 15-18mm. The Scarce Footman is distinguished from the similar Common Footman (Eilema lurideola) by the way it folds its wings close to its body when at rest.  Also note how the pale yellow stripe along the leading edge of the forewing reaches the leading edge without diminishing.

Scarce Footman Eilema complana

The adult flies July and August, and come to light. It is found in a wide variety of habitats, but especially heathland and moorland. Common and widespread in southern and eastern England, less so elsewhere. The larva mainly feeds on lichens.

© Pete Hillman July 2017.

Ruby Tiger Phragmatobia fuliginosa

Erebidae » Arctiinae

Ruby Tiger Phragmatobia fuliginosa

This is a small reddish moth which can vary from pinkish to pinkish-brown with one or two dark central dots on the forewings. The hindwings are bright pinkish-red with greyish markings. Wingspan 28 to 38mm.

Ruby Tiger Phragmatobia fuliginosa

The adult flies in two generations, April to June and July to September. It flies during the day or night and is attracted to light. Found in various open habitats, including open woodland, moorland, heathland, and gardens. Widespread and locally common throughout. The larvae feeds on various herbaceous plants.

Ruby Tiger Phragmatobia fuliginosa

Ruby Tiger Phragmatobia fuliginosa

© Pete Hillman August 2017.

Common Footman Eilema lurideola

Erebidae » Arctiinae

Common Footman Eilema lurideola

Note how the wings of this moth fold flat over its body when at rest. The yellow marginal strip on the forewings tapers to a point at the tip. Forewing length 14 to 17mm.

Common Footman Eilema lurideola

The adult flies July to August and is attracted to light. Found in various habitats including woodland and gardens. The larva feeds on various lichens.

© Pete Hillman July 2017.

Round-winged Muslin Thumatha senex

Erebidae » Arctiinae

Round-winged Muslin Thumatha senex

This is the first time I have seen this moth visit me here with its curious wing shape and very fine wings. Wingspan 15 to 20mm.

The adult flies July and August, and are usually seen on marshland and fenland. Widespread throughout much of Britain, but not common. The larva feeds on lichens.

© Pete Hillman July 2017.

Scarlet Tiger Callimorpha dominula

Erebidae » Arctiinae

Scarlet Tiger Callimorpha dominula

This is a wonderfully bright coloured day-flying moth which I came across on a walk along my local canal. It is quite an unmistakable species with creamy-white and yellowish spots on a black iridescent forewing. The hindwings are reddish with black spots, but other rare forms have yellow hindwings. The forewing pattern is variable. Wingspan 45 to 55mm. Similar to the Cream-spot Tiger (Arctia villica).

Scarlet Tiger Callimorpha dominula

Scarlet Tiger Callimorpha dominula

The adult flies June to July. Found in damp places such a fens, marshes, around pools, river banks, and on cliffs near the sea. A locally common species in southern and central England and southern Wales.

Scarlet Tiger Callimorpha dominula caterpillar

I found this distinctive caterpillar feeding on Common Comfrey (Symphytum officinale) on a walk along a local woodland margin. This is quite a bright and colourful caterpillar with a black body, and with a wide creamy-yellow stripe running along the centre of its back and down either side of its body. It is 35mm long, covered in spiny tufts of short hair, and the head is shiny black.

The Scarlet Tiger overwinters as a larva, and can be seen quite openly feeding by day mainly in early spring in bright sunshine. It feeds on a wide range of herbaceous plants, including Common Nettle, Bramble and especially associated with Common Comfrey (Symphytum officinale).

Adult photographs taken in July 2013, on local canal, and larva in May 2012, on a local woodland margin, Staffordshire, England.