November Moth Epirrita dilutata

Geometridae » Larentiinae

Wingspan 38-44mm. Forewing length 15-20mm.

November Moth Epirrita dilutata

70.107 (BF1795) November Moth Epirrita dilutata ([Denis & Schiffermüller], 1775)

There are four species of Epirrita found in Britain, and all are very similar and variable within themselves, meaning positive identification can normally only be made via genitalia examination. Therefore, these images are only representative of the species.

November Moth Epirrita dilutata

The adult flies from September to November, and it can be found in a wide variety of habitats, including broadleaved woodland and gardens. Common and widespread throughout. The larva feeds on a variety of trees and shrubs.

November Moth Epirrita dilutata

© Pete Hillman October 2017.

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Red-green Carpet Chloroclysta siterata

Geometridae » Larentiinae

Red-green Carpet Chloroclysta siterata

70.095 (BF1760) Red-green Carpet Chloroclysta siterata (Hufnagel, 1767)

Wingspan 30-36mm. Forewing length 14-17mm.

A most attractive species with red and green patterning on the forewings.

Red-green Carpet Chloroclysta siterata

An autumn species, the adult flies in September and October, and appears again in March to May after hibernation. Found in broadleaved woodland, hedgerows and gardens. Resident and local, and widespread. The larva feeds on various deciduous trees.

Red-green Carpet Chloroclysta siterata

© Pete Hillman October 2017.

 

Golden-rod Pug Eupithecia virgaureata

Geometridae » Larentiinae

Golden-rod Pug Eupithecia virgaureata

70.161 (BF1851) Golden-rod Pug Eupithecia virgaureata (Doubleday, 1861)

Wingspan 17-23mm. Forewing length 10-11mm.

Fresh individuals have a white tuft of scales at the end of the abdomen which help distinguish it from other similar species. Easily confused with Grey Pug (E. subfuscata ), and genitalia examination is usually necessary for a positive identification.

The adult flies in two broods in the south, May and June, and July to August. One generation in Scotland, May to June. Rarely seen except when attracted to light. Local, and mainly found in the north and west of England and Wales. The larva feeds on ragworts and Golden-rod.

© Pete Hillman September 2017.

 

Yellow-barred Brindle Acasis viretata

Geometridae » Larentiinae

Yellow-barred Brindle Acasis viretata

70.200 (BF1883) Yellow-barred Brindle Acasis viretata (Hübner, [1799])

Wingspan 25-29mm. Forewing length 10-14mm.

When fresh this moth has a beautiful pattern of green and dark grey, which fades fairly quickly.

Yellow-barred Brindle Acasis viretata

The adult flies in two broods in the south, May and June, and August and September. In the north May and June only. It is found in woodland, parkland, hedgerows and gardens. A localised species, but widespread except further north where it is scarce. The larva feeds on the leaves, buds and flowers of a variety of plants and shrubs, including Ivy and Holly.

© Pete Hillman July 2011.

Small Phoenix Ecliptopera silaceata

Geometridae » Larentiinae

Small Phoenix Ecliptopera silaceata

70.094 (BF1759) Small Phoenix Ecliptopera silaceata ([Denis & Schiffermüller], 1775)

Wingspan 23-27mm. Forewing length 13-17mm.

A dark moth with distinctive patterning. The male rests with the tip of its abdomen pointing upwards.

The adult flies in two broods in the south, from May to July, and then in August and September. One generation in the north. It is found where the larva foodplant willowherbs appears, such as woodland rides, field margins, allotments, waste ground and allotments. A resident species, common and widespread throughout Britain.

© Pete Hillman July 2011.

Yellow Shell Camptogramma bilineata

Geometridae » Larentiinae

Yellow Shell Camptogramma bilineata

70.059 (BF1742) Yellow Shell Camptogramma bilineata (Linnaeus, 1758)

Wingspan 20-25mm. Forewing length 13-16mm.

This is a very variable and attractive moth with bright yellow, white and brown patterning on the forewings.

Yellow Shell Camptogramma bilineata

The adult flies June to August, generally flying at dusk and rarely attending light. Often disturbed during the day from vegetation. It is found in various habitats, including woodland, hedgerows, parks and gardens. The larva feeds on various low-growing plants.

Yellow Shell Camptogramma bilineata

© Pete Hillman July and August 2017.

Peppered Moth Biston betularia

Geometridae » Ennominae

Peppered Moth Biston betularia

70.252 BF1931 Peppered Moth Biston betularia (Linnaeus, 1758)

Wingspan 35-60mm. Forewing length 22-28mm. The rural form is white peppered with black spots, and the completely black form (carbonaria) more common in urban areas, and is a favourite in genetic evolutionary studies. Another form f. insularia, is an intermediate form and has black wings with many white peppered spots.

Industrial Melanism: Over the last 200 years the Peppered Moth has been studied in detail due to its evolutionary changes in colouration. During the Industrial Revolution, due to the high levels of pollution at the time, soot being emitted into the atmosphere covered many trees in the towns and cities, obliterating any lichen or tree bark colouration which made the typical black and white Peppered Moth well camouflaged. Many of these forms died out, but the melanic form carbonaria, thrived as it was more suited to the grimy black environmental conditions of the time.

The adult flies May to August, and is attracted to light at night, and rests on trees during the day. Found in woodland, hedgerows, parks and gardens. Common and widespread. The larva feeds on assorted bushes, trees and plants.

© Pete Hillman July 2017.