Broad-barred White Hecatera bicolorata

Noctuidae » Hadeninae

Broad-barred White Hecatera bicolorata

73.279 (BF2164) Broad-barred White Hecatera bicolorata (Hufnagel, 1766)

Wingspan 28-35mm. Forewing length 13-15mm.

Quite a distinctive species with its white colouration and broad, dark central band on the forewings.

The adult flies June to August, and is found on downland and in gardens. Common and widespread in the south, less so further north. The larva feeds on the flowers and buds of hawkweeds and other related plants.

© Pete Hillman June 2011.

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Bright-line Brown-eye Lacanobia oleracea

Noctuidae » Hadeninae

Bright-line Brown-eye Lacanobia oleracea

73.267 (BF2160) Bright-line Brown-eye Lacanobia oleracea (Linnaeus, 1758)

Wingspan 32-37mm. Forewing length 14-19mm.

The shade of the brown forewing may vary a little. Note the ‘brown-eye’, the kidney-mark with the bright orange blotch in the centre, and the white cross-line forming a ‘W’.

The adult flies May to July, and is found in various habitats, including suburban gardens. Common and widespread. The larva feeds on a wide variety of wild and cultivated herbaceous and woody plants.

© Pete Hillman July 2015.

Smoky Wainscot Mythimna impura

Noctuidae » Hadeninae

Smoky Wainscot Mythimna impura

73.293 (BF2198) Smoky Wainscot Mythimna impura (Hübner, [1808])

Wingspan 31-38mm. Forewing length 14-18mm.

This one looks a little worse for wear with its tattered wings. It is similar to the Common Wainscot (Mythimna pallens), except this species has smoky-grey hindwings. There is also a dark streak running alongside the main white vein on the forewing.

Smoky Wainscot Mythimna impura

The adult flies June to August, and is found on all types of grassland and in urban gardens. Resident, common and widespread throughout. The larva feeds on a variety of grasses.

© Pete Hillman July 2017.

 

Cabbage Moth Mamestra brassicae

Noctuidae » Hadeninae

Cabbage Moth Mamestra brassicae

Cabbage Moth Mamestra brassicae (Linnaeus, 1758) 73.274 BF2154

Wingspan 37-45mm. A fairly distinctively marked moth with a white outline of the kidney mark. The ground-colour can vary.

Cabbage Moth Mamestra brassicae

It has three generations and can be seen May to September. Most frequent in cultivated areas, but found in various habitats, including open woodland. It is attracted to light. A resident species and common throughout Britain, but less so further north.

The caterpillars are pests of cultivated brassicas, but will also feed on the leaves of most cultivated or wild herbaceous plants.

© Pete Hillman May 2014.

Common Wainscot Mythimna pallens

Noctuidae » Hadeninae

Common Wainscot Mythimna pallens

Common Wainscot Mythimna pallens (Linnaeus, 1758) 73.291 BF2199

Forewing length 14-17mm. This moth can be fairly variable in ground colour from reddish to straw coloured. This one is somewhere in between, I think, which is particularly favourable. Similar to Smoky Wainscot (Mythimna impura).

Common Wainscot Mythimna pallens

The adult flies in two generations in the south, May to October, and one in the north, July and August. Seen in gardens, grasslands and on woodland rides. Common and widespread. The larva feeds on various grasses.

Common Wainscot Mythimna pallens

© Pete Hillman June 2017.

The Clay Mythimna ferrago

Noctuidae » Hadeninae

The Clay Mythimna ferrago

The Clay Mythimna ferrago (Fabricius, 1787) 73.298 BF2193

Wingspan 35-40mm. The clay is quite a subtle moth, with variable ground colour, ranging from pinkish brown, buff and straw. It has small white markings on each forewing. The males have a black band on the underside of the abdomen.

The Clay Mythimna ferrago

The adult flies June to August, and are attracted to light. Found in various open habitats, including open woodland, wetland and gardens. Common and widespread. The larva feeds mainly on grasses.

© Pete Hillman July 2015.