Vine’s Rustic Hoplodrina ambigua

Noctuidae » Xyleninae

Vine's Rustic Hoplodrina ambigua

73.099 (BF2384) Vine’s Rustic Hoplodrina ambigua ([Denis & Schiffermüller], 1775)

Wingspan 32-34mm. Forewing length 13-15mm.

A very well-marked moth with distinctive kidney and oval markings.

Vine's Rustic Hoplodrina ambigua

The adult flies in two generations between May and October, and it is found in grassland, heathland,  waste ground and gardens. Common and widespread. The larva feed on various low-growing plants, including docks and Dandelion.

© Pete Hillman August 2017.

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Smoky Wainscot Mythimna impura

Noctuidae » Hadeninae

Smoky Wainscot Mythimna impura

73.293 (BF2198) Smoky Wainscot Mythimna impura (Hübner, [1808])

Wingspan 31-38mm. Forewing length 14-18mm.

This one looks a little worse for wear with its tattered wings. It is similar to the Common Wainscot (Mythimna pallens), except this species has smoky-grey hindwings. There is also a dark streak running alongside the main white vein on the forewing.

Smoky Wainscot Mythimna impura

The adult flies June to August, and is found on all types of grassland and in urban gardens. Resident, common and widespread throughout. The larva feeds on a variety of grasses.

© Pete Hillman July 2017.

 

The Dun-bar Cosmia trapezina

Noctuidae » Xyleninae

The Dun-bar Cosmia trapezina

73.216 BF2318 The Dun-bar Cosmia trapezina (Linnaeus, 1758)

Wingspan 25-33mm. Forewing length 13-16mm.

A fairly variable moth in colouration, but generally brownish with distinct cross-lines and cross-band. It is unlikely to be confused with any other species.

The adult flies July to September. Found in various habitats where there are trees and shrubs, especially woodland, hedgerows, parks and gardens. Common and widespread throughout. The larva feeds on other moth larvae as well as the leaves of various broadleaved trees and shrubs.

© Pete Hillman July 2017.

Slender Brindle Apamea scolopacina

Noctuidae » Xyleninae

Slender Brindle Apamea scolopacina

73.160 BF2335 Slender Brindle Apamea scolopacina (Esper, 1788)

Wingspan 32-36mm. Forewing length 14-17mm. A fairly distinctive and attractive species with a chocolate-brown spot on its thorax.

Slender Brindle Apamea scolopacina

The adult flies July and August, and it is mainly found in woodland. Resident, common and fairly well-distributed in the south and central regions. The larva feeds on various woodland grasses.

© Pete Hillman July 2017.

Pale Mottled Willow Caradrina clavipalpis

Noctuidae » Xyleninae

Pale Mottled Willow Caradrina clavipalpis

73.095 BF2389 Pale Mottled Willow Caradrina clavipalpis (Scopoli, 1763)

Wingspan 26-35mm. Forewing length 12-15mm. A delicately marked, mottled moth with dark spots along the leading edge of the forewing, and kidney-markings variably edged in pale dots.

The adult flies July and September, and is found in grassland, farmland and urban gardens. Resident and suspected immigrant. Fairly common and widespread. The larva feeds on the grain of various cereal crops, including stored produce.

© Pete Hillman July 2017.

Grey Dagger Acronicta psi

Noctuidae » Acronictinae

Grey Dagger Acronicta psi

73.038 BF2284 Grey Dagger Acronicta psi (Linnaeus, 1758)

Wingspan 30-40 mm. Forewing length 17-20mm. This moth gets it name from the black dagger-like markings on its forewings. Please note that these images are for reference only, as it is not possible to tell apart from the Dark Dagger (A. tridens), without genitalia dissection, and is normally recorded as an aggregate species.

Grey Dagger Acronicta psi

The adult flies June and August, and is found in most habitats, including woodland, hedgerows and gardens. A resident species, common and widespread throughout except Scotland where it is more local. The larva feeds on a large range of broad-leaved trees and shrubs.

© Pete Hillman July 2017.

Lunar Underwing Omphaloscelis lunosa

Noctuidae » Xyleninae

Lunar Underwing Omphaloscelis lunosa

73.193 BF2270 Lunar Underwing Omphaloscelis lunosa (Haworth, 1809)

Wingspan 32-38 mm. Forewing length 14-17mm. There is a dark ‘crescent moon’ marking on the pale underwing of this moth which gives it its name. The forewing ground colour is quite variable, ranging from yellowish-orange to dark brown. The paler veins give it a somewhat netted look.

Lunar Underwing Omphaloscelis lunosa

The adult flies in one generation from mid-August to late October. It regularly comes to light, and is found in grassy areas like parks, gardens and downland. A resident species, it is common and widespread in the south, more localised further north. The larva feeds on grasses.

Lunar Underwing Omphaloscelis lunosa

Lunar Underwing Omphaloscelis lunosa

Lunar Underwing Omphaloscelis lunosa

© Pete Hillman September 2017.