Narrow-bordered Five-spot Burnet Zygaena lonicerae

Zygaenidae » Zygaeninae

Narrow-bordered Five-spot Burnet Zygaena lonicerae

An attractively bright day-flying moth, with yes, you guessed it, five red spots on each forewing. Forewing length 15 to 19mm. Similar to the Five-Spot Burnet (Zygaena trifolii), which is less common and more localised.

Narrow-bordered Five-spot Burnet Zygaena lonicerae

The adult flies June to July, and they are seen in rough grassland and chalk downland. Common and widespread throughout, except in Scotland where it is more localised. The larva feed on clovers and vetches, and the like.

© Pete Hillman June 2017, local field, Staffordshire, England.

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Six-spot Burnet Zygaena filipendulae

Zygaenidae » Zygaeninae

Six-spot Burnet Zygaena filipendulae

Who ever said moths were drab and uninteresting? Well this day-flying moth will give any butterfly a run for its money on the eye-ball popping colour and brightness scale. Black-bodied and black-winged moth with six distinct red spots on each forewing. Wingspan 30 to 38mm.

Six-spot Burnet Zygaena filipendulae

The adult flies June to August. A diurnal moth, often seen in flowery meadows, roadside verges, woodland rides, and grassy coastal sites such as dunes. Common and widespread throughout Britain. The larva feeds mainly on Common Bird’s-foot Trefoil, but also Greater Bird’s-foot Trefoil.

Six-spot Burnet Zygaena filipendulae

Six-spot Burnet Zygaena filipendulae

© Pete Hillman July 2005, local field, Staffordshire, England.