Orange Swift Triodia sylvina

Hepialidae

Orange Swift Triodia sylvina

3.001 (BF15) Orange Swift Triodia sylvina (Linnaeus, 1761)

Wingspan 32-48mm. Forewing length 12-26mm.

The sexes are quite different, with the males being smaller and brightly coloured compared to the larger and plainer females. The images featured are that of the male.

Orange Swift Triodia sylvina

The adult flies from June to early September, and can be found in a variety of habitats, including gardens and on woodland rides. A resident species, and common and widespread. The larva feeds on the roots of a variety herbaceous plants.

Orange Swift Triodia sylvina

© Pete Hillman August 2011.

Advertisements

Flax Tortrix Cnephasia asseclana

Tortricidae » Tortricinae

Flax Tortrix Cnephasia asseclana

Flax Tortrix Cnephasia asseclana ([Denis & Schiffermüller], 1775) 49.051 BF1021

Wingspan 15-18 mm. Forewing length 7-10mm. A somewhat muted coloured, variegated or mottled moth. This is quite a variable species and it can be very similar to other Cnephasia species, and hence the image above is only representative of the species. Genitalia dissection is usually required for confirmation.

The adult flies June to August and is attracted to light. It is found in open woodland, scrub, hedgerows and gardens. Common and widespread. The larva feeds on various herbaceous plants.

© Pete Hillman June 2017.

White Plume Moth Pterophorus pentadactyla

Pterophoridae » Pterophorinae

White Plume Moth Pterophorus pentadactyla

White Plume Moth Pterophorus pentadactyla (Linnaeus, 1758) 45.030 BF1513

Wingspan 26-34mm. Forewing length 12-16mm. A very unusual and most distinctive white feathery-winged moth. This is one of the largest of the Plume moths, with wings divided into several feathered fingers.

The adult flies July to August, and sometimes there is a second generation in September. Easily disturbed during the day, and attracted to light. Found in gardens, rough ground, grassland, and fens. Common and widespread. The larva feeds on Bindweed.

© Pete Hillman July 2011.

Dusky Thorn Ennomos fuscantaria

Geometridae » Ennominae

Dusky Thorn Ennomos fuscantaria male

The camouflage of this thorn is like autumn leaves. Compare the antennae of the female in the bottom image and the male in the other images, which is feathery.

Dusky Thorn Ennomos fuscantaria male

The adult flies from August to October, and it is found in deciduous woods and gardens. The larva feeds on the leaves of ash.

Dusky Thorn Ennomos fuscantaria male

Dusky Thorn Ennomos fuscantaria male

Dusky Thorn Ennomos fuscantaria female

© Pete Hillman September 2017.

 

Common Marbled Carpet Dysstroma truncata

Geometridae » Larentiinae

Common Marbled Carpet Dysstroma truncataQuite a variable species of macro-moth. One form has a large light-brownish patch on the forewings, whilst others are black or dark brown. Wingspan 24 to 30mm.

Common Marbled Carpet Dysstroma truncataThe adult flies May to June, August to October in two generations. It is easily attracted to light, and is found in most places, from gardens, woods and grassland. A common and widespread species. The larvae feeds on various trees and shrubs.

Common Marbled Carpet Dysstroma truncata

Common Marbled Carpet Dysstroma truncata

Common Marbled Carpet Dysstroma truncata

© Pete Hillman August 2017.

Ruby Tiger Phragmatobia fuliginosa

Erebidae » Arctiinae

Ruby Tiger Phragmatobia fuliginosa

This is a small reddish moth which can vary from pinkish to pinkish-brown with one or two dark central dots on the forewings. The hindwings are bright pinkish-red with greyish markings. Wingspan 28 to 38mm.

Ruby Tiger Phragmatobia fuliginosa

The adult flies in two generations, April to June and July to September. It flies during the day or night and is attracted to light. Found in various open habitats, including open woodland, moorland, heathland, and gardens. Widespread and locally common throughout. The larvae feeds on various herbaceous plants.

Ruby Tiger Phragmatobia fuliginosa

Ruby Tiger Phragmatobia fuliginosa

© Pete Hillman August 2017.

Common Carpet Epirrhoe alternata

Geometridae » Larentiinae

Common Carpet Epirrhoe alternata

Quite a beautiful coloured and patterned moth, and can be confused with other carpets. Wingspan 20 to 25mm.

The adults fly in two generations from May to September in the south, and in the north there is one brood July to August. It can be seen in various habitats including hedgerows, woodland and gardens. Common and fairly widespread. The larva feeds on bedstraws.

© Pete Hillman August 2017.